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Tag: Homestead Hero

Homestead Heros Plants of Promise: Elderberry

Homestead Heros Plants of Promise: Elderberry

The common elderberry is oftentimes overlooked in its value on the homestead.  While it is native in many areas it has also naturalized in so many places that most folks take it for granted.  Elderberries can easily be wild harvested in many parts of the country.  Until fairly recently, improved cultivars have been rare and relatively expensive here in the States. The elderberry forms an attractive shrub or can be trained into a small tree reching 10 to 15 feet…

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Perennial Homestead Gardens

Perennial Homestead Gardens

Perennial Crops for the Homestead & Beyond Here at the Traditional Catholic Homestead we have a bit of an affinity for perennials.  Wherther it be tasty vegies or the ever popular berries we go in big for perennial crops!  A big draw for me, as the main garden guy, is the reduction of care and maintenance that most perrenial crops require.  Over time your perennial garden beds will build their own little micro-ecosystems and will tollerate considerable neglect, which around…

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Dynamic Accumulators: The What, Why, & Who

Dynamic Accumulators: The What, Why, & Who

Last time I posted about homestead weeds, I made mention of dynamic accumulators.  Today I thought I might go into a little more about what they are, why you would want to plant them, and which dynamic accumulators we are using here on the Traditional Catholic Homestead (the who). What:  Simply put dynamic accumulators are plants that concentrate minerals and nutrients from deep in the soil horizon and bring them to the surface in their leaves, fruits, and plant bodies….

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Seaberry

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Seaberry

Seaberry Seaberry or seabuckthorn is another of the lesser known (in the United States) plants that every homestead in a temperate climate should have growing.  Often times seaberry is referred to as the citrus of the north.  Owing to it high vitamin C content (up to 15x greater than that of oranges) and other healthful benefits seaberry has gained fame as a super fruit!  Unique in the world of berries seabuckthorn has been shown to be a good source of…

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Currants

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Currants

Currants & Gooseberries Ribes species (currants and gooseberries) are one of the forgotten gems in the homesteader’s arsenal of plant species.  Currants are an extremely hardy (to -30F.), highly productive, and long lived perennial berry.  They are tolerant of most soils, and produce well from full to partial shade.   Currants prefer well drained soil, as water logged roots severely hamper growth and vigor.  Like many berries ribes have a relatively shallow root system so they can be prone to drying…

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Borage

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Borage

Borage This often overlooked, and somewhat forgotten herb should be near the top of the list for every homestead garden!  With alternate names like Bee Bread, and Bee Bush the reason should be obvious… pollinators absolutely go crazy for it!  Borage gets another of its common names, Starflower, from its brilliant blue, five petaled, small but prolific flowers.  I have a video here showing several different types of pollinators all over the borage in my greenhouse (there’s even a hummingbird…

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Rhubarb

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Rhubarb

Rhubarb Aside from asparagus, rhubarb is probably one of the most easily recognizable perennials on the homestead.  This hardy garden standout is easily propagated, and has many uses for us on the Traditional Catholic Homestead. Propagating rhubarb is most commonly done through root division or crown cuttings.  Less frequent is propagation through seed.  I’ve planted both purchased crowns and splits from a friend.  This method is easy and reliable… you know exactly what you are getting, a clone of the…

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Comfrey

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Comfrey

Comfrey, Queen of the Homestead Garden! Comfrey is a utilitarian crop on the Traditional Catholic Homestead.  We use it in companion planting as a support species, as a fodder crop to feed the chickens, hogs, and sheep, and as a powerful herbal remedy.  Comfrey is a hardy perennial that is easily propagated.  This multi-function plant is a champion on our homestead!  Permaculturist celebrate comfrey for its utility on the farm, being a farm function stacking rockstar. Growing comfrey is a…

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Garlic

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Garlic

Homestead Hero: Garlic Ok, so this week I’m back on track, delivering what I promised last time!  The king of alliums… GARLIC!  I know a lot of folks who just won’t grow garlic because they say it is too invasive, and costs next to nothing at the store.   Once you plant it you can’t get the garlic out of that spot, and it will spread, it’s cheap to buy, and…  Whatever!  Here on the Traditional Catholic Homestead, I say…

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Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Ground Nut & Strawberry

Homestead Heros, Plants of Promise: Ground Nut & Strawberry

Groundnut (Apios Americana)& Strawberries too! I know last time I promised strawberries, but the American Groundnut is just so much cooler! Being a man of my word this week you’ll be getting a twofer!  Real quick like I’ll go over how we use strawberries on the Traditional Catholic Homestead, and then I’ll go into greater detail on the Groundnut. Strawberries:  there’s a ton of info out there on how to grow and cultivate the strawberry so I won’t really go into…

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